A few frequent flyers ‘dominate air travel’ (so dominating aviation…

a-few-frequent-flyers-‘dominate-air-travel’-(so-dominating-aviation…

A few frequent flyers ‘dominate air travel’ (so dominating aviation…

A few frequent flyers ‘dominate air travel’ (so dominating aviation CO2 emissions) – in all richer countries
2021-03-31 10:43:00
Research for the climate campaign group, Possible, shows that a small minority of frequent flyers dominate air travel in almost all countries with high aviation CO2 emissions.  In the UK, 70% of flights are made by a wealthier 15% of the population, with 57% not flying abroad at all, in any one year. The Possible research suggests the frequent flyer trend is mirrored in other wealthy countries.   USA: 12% of people take 66% of flights.  France: 2% of people take 50% of flights. Canada: 22% of the population takes 73% of flights.  The Netherlands: 8% of people takes 42% of flights.  China: 5% of households takes 40% of flights.  India: 1% of households takes 45% of flights.  Indonesia: 3% of households takes 56% of flights. There are calls for a frequent flyer levy – a tax that increases the more you fly each year.  John Sauven, executive director of Greenpeace: “Taxing frequent fliers is a good idea – but we also have to do something about air miles, which reward frequent fliers for flying more frequently. This is obscene during a climate crisis – and it should be stopped.” The Treasury take the line that “Frequent flyers already pay more under the current APD (Air Passenger Duty) system” but that misses the point. They pay the same rate of APD on each flight, the first, the fifth or the tenth that year. A tax that ramped up on each successive flight would be a greater deterrent to frequent flying. .Tweet  A few frequent flyers ‘dominate air travel’ By Roger HarrabinBBC environment analyst (BBC) 31.3.2021 A small minority of frequent flyers dominate air travel in almost all countries with high aviation emissions, analysis suggests. In the UK, 70% of flights are made by a wealthy 15% of the population, with 57% not flying abroad at all. There are calls for a frequent flyer levy – a tax that increases the more you fly each year. Greenpeace supports the tax and also wants air miles banned because they say it encourages frequent flying. The UK government said it is reviewing aviation taxes, but insisted that a frequent flier levy would have many problems. The campaigners believe frequent flyer levies would be broadly popular because they disproportionately affect the rich, who fly the most. The UK Citizens’ Assembly last year supported the principle that people who fly more should be taxed more. Government urged to bring in ‘frequent flyer levy’ Climate change ‘may curb growth in flying’ Research for the climate campaign group Possible says that, in the US, just 12% of people take two-thirds of flights. The government’s advisory Climate Change Committee wants a levy on frequent fliers. The Possible research suggests the frequent flyer trend is mirrored in other wealthy countries. Canada: 22% of the population takes 73% of flights The Netherlands: 8% of people takes 42% of flights. China: 5% of households takes 40% of flights India: 1% of households takes 45% of flights. Indonesia: 3% of households takes 56% of flights. Alethea Warrington, from Possible, said: “This report shows the same pattern of inequality around the world – a small minority of frequent

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