Airlines will not be able to avoid higher costs if…

airlines-will-not-be-able-to-avoid-higher-costs-if…

Airlines will not be able to avoid higher costs if…

Airlines will not be able to avoid higher costs if they use novel (lower carbon) fuels
2021-11-20 10:55:00
The CEO of Delta, which is probably the world second biggest airline, has said that tackling climate change will make flying more expensive. [And so it should].  Ed Bastian claims that after spending $30m (£22.4m) a year on carbon-offsetting the airline has been “carbon neutral” since March 2020. It has also pledged to spend $1bn over the next decade to cancel out all the emissions it creates.  It gives no details of how it is doing this, and it is well known that most carbon offsets do not work, and the carbon is NOT “cancelled out.” The most effective way to cut the greenhouse gases produced by aviation is to have fewer flights and fewer passengers.  But the airlines all intend to grow, perhaps by 3% per year if they can.  Their only hope of reducing their emissions a little, while they expand, is novel aviation fuels (referred to as sustainable aviation fuel) – SAF.  These will be difficult to produce, and probably impossible to produce in the amounts the aviation industry want. The cost of these fuels is high, which will mean more expensive flying.  Delta wants to use 10% sustainable aviation fuel by the end of 2030. Ryanair wants 12.5% SAF by 2030; IAG wants 10% by 2030. The EU says SAF currently accounts for just 0.05% of jet fuel use in the EU. .Tweet       Delta boss says climate change means flying will cost more By Jonathan Josephs, Business reporter, BBC News 16.11.2021 The boss of the world’s second biggest airline has said that tackling climate change will make flying more expensive. “Over time, it’s going to cost us all more, but it’s the right approach that we must take,” Delta Air Lines chief executive Ed Bastian told the BBC. Aviation is responsible for about 2.5% of the carbon emissions that are warming the planet, according to the International Energy Agency. [And perhaps double that figure, for the warming effect of burning jet fuel at altitude. AW comment]  Critics argue the best way to reduce them is by flying less. Atlanta-based Delta says that after spending $30m (£22.4m) a year on carbon-offsetting it has been carbon neutral since March 2020. It has also pledged to spend $1bn over the next decade to cancel out all the emissions it creates.  [How exactly??]  More fuel-efficient planes, sustainable aviation fuels and removing carbon from the atmosphere are some of the ways it hopes to achieve this. …. Andreas Schafer, professor of energy and transport at University College London, says it will “cost trillions rather than billions of dollars” to move the global aviation sector to net zero carbon emissions. Preliminary results from his team’s research suggest airfares would need to increase by 10%-20% to cover the costs. “In the short-term, government support will be needed with those costs as decarbonising aviation will be extremely challenging, and current efforts will need to be scaled up dramatically”, says Prof Schafer.  [It is not at all obvious why taxpayers’ money should be used to pay for the aviation industry’s problems, when most of the flights are taken by a minority.  AW comment] Moving aviation to net zero carbon emissions is the right approach, says Ed Bastian Mr Bastian concedes it is an ambitious goal that his airline won’t be able to achieve alone. “It’s the biggest long-term challenge this industr

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