Aviation sector is hoping, unrealistically, that future “carbon capture &…

aviation-sector-is-hoping,-unrealistically,-that-future-“carbon-capture-&…

Aviation sector is hoping, unrealistically, that future “carbon capture &…

Aviation sector is hoping, unrealistically, that future “carbon capture & storage” will solve its CO2 problems
2022-01-06 17:27:00
There is a presumption in all future climate scenarios, aiming to get to “net zero” by 2050 (or whenever) that “negative carbon technologies” will have to be used. It will be essential to try to remove some of the CO2 from the global atmosphere.  Obviously, a more effective way to keep global CO2 to a lower figure would be to stop emitting it, over the next decade or two decades. But governments and businesses, including the aviation sector, are not keen on doing that; it would be bad for business.  Even the most optimistic forecasts for the amount of carbon that could be captured by DACCS (Direct Air Carbon Capture and Storage) would only be a tiny % of annual emissions, let alone the millions of tonnes emitted in the past. The technology is expensive and uses a great deal of energy. So far, the only carbon capture that has been profitable has been pumping the captured CO2 into depleting oil and gas fields, in order to get out more oil and gas (totally negating the purpose of capturing the CO2 in the first place). Aviation will want people to believe in the future magical abilities of this tech – people need to be very sceptical indeed.  Beware dangerous greenwash. .Tweet   SUSTAINABLE FUTURE ‘For us, it is not a solution’: Enel CEO skeptical over the use of carbon capture NOV 25 2021 By Anmar Frangoul (CNBC) “There is a rule of thumb here: if a technology doesn’t really pick up in five years … you better drop it,” Starace says. The CEO was speaking after Enel published a strategic plan for 2022-24 and laid out its aims for the years ahead. The CEO of multinational Italian energy firm Enel has expressed doubt on the usefulness of carbon capture and storage, suggesting the technology is not a climate solution. “We have tried and tried — and when I say ‘we’, I mean the electricity industry,” Francesco Starace told CNBC’s Karen Tso on Wednesday. “You can imagine, we tried hard in the past 10 years — maybe more, 15 years — because if we had a reliable and economically interesting solution, why would we go and shut down all these coal The European Commission, the EU’s executive arm, has described carbon capture and storage as a suite of technologies focused on “capturing, transporting, and storing CO2 emitted from power plants and industrial facilities.” The idea is to stop CO2 “reaching the atmosphere, by storing it in suitable underground geological formations.” The Commission has said the utilization of carbon capture and storage is “important” when it comes to helping lower greenhouse gas emissions. This view is based on the contention that a substantial proportion of both industry and power generation will still be reliant on fossil fuels in the years ahead. Enel’s Starace, however, seemed skeptical about carbon capture’s potential. “The fact is, it doesn’t work, it hasn’t worked for us so far,” he said. “And there is a rule of thumb here:  If a technology doesn’t really pick up in five years — and here we’re talking about more than five, we’re talking about 15, at least — you better drop it.” There are other climate solutions, Starace said. “Basically, stop emitting carbon,” he said. “I’m not saying it’s not worth trying again but we’re not going to do it. Maybe other industries can try harder and succeed. For us, it is not a solution.” Carbon capture technology is often held up as a source of hope https://www.cnbc.com/2021/07/20/climate-crisis-and-carbon-capture-why-some-are-worried-about-its-role.html in reducing global greenhouse gas emissions, featuring prominently in countries’ climate plans as well as the net-zero strategies of some of the world’s largest oil and gas companies. Proponents of these technologies believe they can play an impor

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