Aviation’s present-day contribution to human-induced global warming is 4% and…

aviation’s-present-day-contribution-to-human-induced-global-warming-is-4%-and…

Aviation’s present-day contribution to human-induced global warming is 4% and…

Aviation’s present-day contribution to human-induced global warming is 4% and is likely to increase over the next 30 years
2021-11-05 23:04:00
It is possible that, though the global heating impact of aviation so far has been about 4%, this could make up about one-sixth (about 16%) of the remaining temperature budget required to limit global warming to 1.5˚C by 2050.  A recently published article, by a number of well recognised academics, suggests that emissions produced by the aviation industry must be reduced each year if the sector’s emissions are not to increase warming further. The authors show that the only way to ‘freeze’ the temperature increase from the sector is to cut its CO2 emissions by about 2.5% per year.  The industry plans extensive growth over coming decades, but the academics say “there is little chance for the aviation industry to meet any climate target if it aims for a return to normal.” There are hopes the low carbon fuels could be found, and also that the non-CO2 impacts of burning jet fuel at high altitude could be cut, by using different fuels, emitting less water. .Tweet   Aviation’s present-day contribution to human-induced global warming is 4% and will increase over the next 30 years NOVEMBER 4, 2021by Institute of Physics Warming stripes of aviation, showing the percentage contribution to global warming from 1980 to 2021. Credit: Developed as part of ongoing collaboration with the European Aviation Safety Agency’s environmental work (e.g. ec.europa.eu/transport/sites/default/files/2019-aviation-environmental-report.pdf ) Aviation is responsible for more global warming than implied by its carbon footprint alone. According to new research published today, aviation could consume up one-sixth of the remaining temperature budget required to limit warming to 1.5˚C by 2050. The article, published in Environmental Research Letters, suggests that emissions produced by the aviation industry must be reduced ea

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