BBC’s Digging for Britain to feature Hull’s big Castle Street…

bbc’s-digging-for-britain-to-feature-hull’s-big-castle-street…

BBC’s Digging for Britain to feature Hull’s big Castle Street…

BBC’s Digging for Britain to feature Hull’s big Castle Street dig
2022-01-05 13:59:00
Finds from an archaeological dig next to Hull's busiest road are being highlighted on national TV. Discoveries at the site of the former Trinity Burial Ground have been featured in Hull Live over the last 12 months. The work by teams from Oxford Archaeology and Humber Field Archaeology was mainly carried out inside two large temporary tents installed next to Castle Street. For the latest traffic and travel news, click here. It was billed as the largest ever excavation of a post-medieval burial site in the North of England and was part of National Highways' £335m A63 improvement scheme. The remains of around 9,500 burials were examined in mobile laboratories before being re-buried within the grounds of Hull Minster and wide range of artefacts were found, most dating from the late 18th and early 19th century when most of the burials took place. Archaeologists used state-of-the-art equipment to scan skeletons from the site to help piece together a detailed picture of health and social conditions during the period. An archaeologist working at the Trinity burial ground in Hull Finds included specially-made devices to protect coffins from being broken open by grave-robbers to coins, pipes, pottery and even a mysterious glass bottle marked Hull Royal Infirmary and full of liquid which had been deliberately placed between the legs of a skeleton. The tents were recently taken down with most of the physical work at the site now completed but the excavation will feature in a new series of Digging for Britain being screened on BBC Two on Thursday night. National Highways project manager for the A63 Castle Street improvement Fran Oliver said: “While we are very much about building roads that are fit for the future, it’s important to not forget the past and it has been an absolute pleasure to piece together Hull’s history as part of this important upgrade for the city. A giant conch shell was one of the more unusual finds during the excavation at the Trinity burial ground in Hull (Image: Oxford Archaeology North) “We were just as captivated as local residents and were delighted to be able to share the findings with the local community through a number of online presentations. “We are equally excited that this significant excavation is now being shared with a wider audience through BBC Two’s Digging for Britain.” An ornamental brooch found by archaeologists at the Castle Street excavation in Hull (Image: Highways E

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