Covid may have a long term effect of reducing long-haul…

covid-may-have-a-long-term-effect-of-reducing-long-haul…

Covid may have a long term effect of reducing long-haul…

Covid may have a long term effect of reducing long-haul flight demand (leisure and business)
2022-03-18 18:50:00
It seems that, while demand for short haul flights may be returning, people are not booking long-haul trips – either leisure or business – in the numbers they used to pre-Covid. The pattern of long-haul holiday demand may take years to return, if it ever does. Though many Covid restrictions are now reducing, there are many uncertainties, and travel is more hassle to more distant places. The price of jet fuel has risen, and also the unanticipated crisis of the Ukraine invasion. There were still around 1,400 wide-bodied, long haul planes (about 30% of the total) in storage in aircraft hangers at the start of December 2021 – but few short haul.  Although long haul make up just 6% of the flights leaving European airports, they produce more than half of Europe’s aviation CO2 emissions, according to Eurocontrol. Many businesses have switched most of their international contact to videoconferencing, rather than face to face meetings. In March 2022, T&E (Transport & Environment) is planning to launch a corporate travel campaign to reduce – even a 15% cut is significant.  But will the change in flying habits last for long? .Tweet     Covid’s effect on long-haul flights will have a big impact on aviation emissions First the pandemic, now the war. Long-distance flying was not expected to recover until 2024, but now the wait could be longer. As a result, aviation emissions are decreasing. By Dave Keating 16.3.2020 (Energy Monitor) In January 2022, the European Travel Commission, a tourism promotion organisation, had good news and bad news for the aviation industry. The good news was that its research showed air travel within the EU was predicted to recover to pre-pandemic levels by the end of 2022. The bad news was that long-haul intercontinental travel would not recover until 2024. The worst of the pandemic may be over, for now, but consumers are still feeling nervous about booking expensive long-haul trips. Not only is there the concern about having to cancel them, there are also more onerous vaccination and testing requirements for destinations outside one’s own country, or outside the EU in the case of Europeans. Travel within the EU has been relatively hassle-free for the vaccinated, but outside of the EU has been a different story. The same pattern is being observed in the US – people prefer to take inter-state trips and are wary of leaving the country. Now, the war in Ukraine looks set to extend this trend further. People generally shy away from international travel during periods of insecurity, and this is the most intense period of insecurity for Europeans since the Second World War

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