Dutch watchdog rules KLM’s ‘Carbon Zero’ advert is misleading

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Dutch watchdog rules KLM’s ‘Carbon Zero’ advert is misleading

Dutch watchdog rules KLM’s ‘Carbon Zero’ advert is misleading
2022-04-13 10:47:00
The Dutch advertising watchdog (like the UK’s ASA) ruled that a KLM promotion telling customers they could fly carbon-emission free is misleading.  The ad’s tag line, “Be a hero, fly CO2 zero,” is an absolute claim, the Dutch Advertising Code Committee said in their verdict and the company had the burden of proving the statement – it could not. While the ruling is limited to only one airline it touches on broader pressure on airlines to lower their carbon footprint and ‘flight-shaming’ campaigns to get people to stopping flying. Commercially viable alternatives like electric and hydrogen powered jetliners are decades away – so all airlines can do at present is “offsetting” carbon emissions (that is not an effective measure). Offsets such as tree planting and forest protection are no proper compensation for carbon emitted, by a journey or other burning of fossil fuels. There is no real chance of genuinely low carbon aviation fuel being available in significant amounts, without causing various other environmental problems.  KLM has two weeks to decide whether it wants to appeal. .Tweet   Dutch Watchdog Rules KLM’s ‘Carbon Zero’ Ad Is Misleading By Diederik Baazil (Bloomberg) 8 April 2022 The Dutch advertising watchdog ruled that a KLM promotion telling customers they could fly carbon-emission free is misleading. The ad’s tag line, “Be a hero, fly CO2 zero,” is an absolute claim, the Dutch Advertising Code Committee said in a verdict seen Friday by Bloomberg. As such, the company has the burden of proving the statement and didn’t meet that test, the committee said. A spokesman for the airline, the Dutch arm of Air France-KLM, declined to comment. While the ruling is limited to only one carrier, it touches on broader pressure on airlines to lower their carbon footprint and ‘flight-shaming’ campaigns to get people to stopping flying. Commercially viable alternatives like electric and hydrogen powered jetliners are at least a decade away so carriers are relying on measures like carbon offsetting to reduce impact. Airlines are now buying carbon offsets, or offering customers the option pay extra for them, to convince travelers that, on a net basis, their tr

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