Environmental Audit Cttee (EAC) call for evidence on “net zero…

environmental-audit-cttee-(eac)-call-for-evidence-on-“net-zero…

Environmental Audit Cttee (EAC) call for evidence on “net zero…

Environmental Audit Cttee (EAC) call for evidence on “net zero aviation” and shipping
2021-07-20 15:53:00
The (really excellent) Environmental Audit Committee (EAC) has started a call for evidence for its inquiry on how to achieve “net zero” aviation and shipping.  It closes on 3 September and “Respondents need not answer all the questions and evidence need not be limited to these questions.” Aviation now makes up (2019) 7% of UK carbon emissions, and shipping 3%. The Government’s recently published “Transport Decarbonisation Strategy” has pledged that new technology will allow domestic flights to be emissions-free by 2040, and international aviation to be zero carbon by 2050. The EAC asks a lot of vital questions about this, such as that the industry’s plans need rely on carbon removal, the technologies for which are not yet developed at scale.  They point out that reducing demand for air travel represents the most cost-effective method available for maintaining current emission levels (though the government is unwilling to introduce measures to restrict air travel demand. The EAC is asking for comment on future production/availability of low carbon fuels, and the most equitable way to reduce aircraft passenger numbers (e.g. taxation, frequent flyer levies, restrictions on airport capacity etc). .Tweet     Call for Evidence by the Environmental Audit Committee (EAC) Net zero aviation and shipping https://committees.parliament.uk/call-for-evidence/542/ The Environmental Audit Committee is launching an inquiry into net zero aviation and shipping. Aviation and shipping pose major challenges to reducing emissions, due to their reliance on fossil fuels and since international emissions were not included in the Paris climate change agreement, requiring countries to take action. Together they account for 10% of UK greenhouse gas emissions and on current trends, aviation will be the largest emitting sector by 2050.[1] Following the Climate Change Committee’s advice, the Government has confirmed that the UK’s Sixth Carbon Budget (covering the years 2033 to 2037) will incorporate the UK’s share of international aviation and shipping emissions for the first time.[2] The Government has said it aims to introduce the necessary legislation to include these emissions within the next year.[3] Aviation The UK Government, international bodies and the aviation industry have proposed a number of initiatives to mitigate emissions from aviation, including: Market-based measures such as the United Nations CORSIA program, EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) and the UK ETS; Measures to improve the fuel efficiency of conventional aviation such as through changes to aircraft, air traffic management, airspace modernisation and ground operations at airports; and Measures to promote the development and use of low carbon technologies such as zero carbon fuels (electricity and hydrogen), alternative hydrocarbon fuels (biofuels) and aircraft designs (wing, airframe and engine designs).[4] The Government’s recently published Transport Decarbonisation Strategy has pledged that new technology will allow domestic flights to be emissions-free by 2040, and international aviation to be zero carbon by 2050. The UK has a large and mature aviation sector comprising aircraft manufacturers, fuel producers and air service providers, and is well-placed to take a technological lead. According to the industry, without Government support, low carbon technologies are unlikely to develop fast enough to play a significant role in mitigating emissions before 2050.[5] The industry’s plans to meet net zero by 2050, rely on aviation funding carbon removal, the technologies for which are not yet developed at scale.[6] The Jet Zero Council (a partnership between industry and Government) has been established with the aim of delivering zero-emission transatlantic flight within a generation. The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has developed a global offsetting mechanism, called CORSIA (Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation) which aims to stabilise net CO emissions starting in 2021, but it has been criticised for not requiring emission reductions.[7] Reducing demand for air travel represents the most cost-effective method available for maintaining current emission levels.[8] 96% of the UK’s aviation emissions come from international, mainly long-haul, flights,[9] while around 15% of the UK’s population generate over 70% of the UK’s international air travel.[10] Targeted efforts towards those that fly frequently to adopt new behaviour could result in significant emissions reductions. Shipping Most people do not realise they have any connection with shipping, unless they take a cruise, but huge quantities of consumer goods and food comes into the UK by sea. International shipping transports more than 80% cent of global trade,[11] and it is expected that global demand for shipping will increase in the next few decades. According to the International Maritime Organization (IMO), which has responsibility for international shipping emissions, CO₂ emissions from shipping are projected to increase by up to 50% above 2018 levels by 2050 if no actions are taken.[12] Heavy fuel oil dominates

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