Flights v flamingos: can Barcelona wetland wildlife reserve survive airport…

flights-v-flamingos:-can-barcelona-wetland-wildlife-reserve-survive-airport…

Flights v flamingos: can Barcelona wetland wildlife reserve survive airport…

Flights v flamingos: can Barcelona wetland wildlife reserve survive airport expansion plans?
2021-06-05 09:12:00
The Delta del Llobregat, one of the most important wetlands in the western Mediterranean, is being eroded on one side by the sea and on the other by Barcelona’s land-hungry airport. Before the pandemic there were already close to 90 flights an hour and, if the airport authority has its way, this will increase still further. The delta covers 920 hectares and has 14 distinct ecosystems, ranging from coastal, marshland and lagoons to pine forests and farmland. As well as being home to a birds, a colony of turtles, there are more than 1,000 plant species, including 22 varieties of orchids. In the decades-long war of flamingos versus air passengers, the flamingos have lost every round. The airport wants to extend the runway into the wetlands and build another terminal, allowing passenger numbers to rise from 55 to 70 million a year. But now the European commission has weighed in, accusing the Spanish and Catalan governments of failing to protect the wetlands and warning against a proposed expansion of the airport. The EC says the Llobregat Delta ecosystem hosts outstanding biodiversity and plays a crucial role in the migratory routes of many European bird species.   .Tweet     The age of extinction Flights v flamingos: can Barcelona wildlife reserve survive airport expansion? A plane takes off from Barcelona airport near the Delta del Llobregat wetlands.  Billion-dollar development threatens the future of one of the western Mediterranean’s most important wetlands By  Stephen Burgen in the Delta del Llobregat, Spain   (The Guardian) 29 May 2021 The silence is so complete it is easy to forget you are only a few minutes’ drive from the centre of Barcelona. Just the sough of the willows in the sea breeze, the splash of a fish surfacing and a heron’s cry – until the serenity is obliterated by a plane taking off. The Delta del Llobregat, one of the most important wetlands in the western Mediterranean, is being eroded on one side by the sea and on the other by the city’s land-hungry airport. As travel to Spain is still restricted, there are few flights and it is possible to revel in the delta’s almost mesmeric tranquillity. But before the pandemic there were already close to 90 flights an hour and, if the airport authority has its way, this will increase still further. The delta covers 920 hectares (2,280 acres) and has 14 distin

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