Government accepts its “net zero” climate strategy is unlawful and…

government-accepts-its-“net-zero”-climate-strategy-is-unlawful-and…

Government accepts its “net zero” climate strategy is unlawful and…

Government accepts its “net zero” climate strategy is unlawful and must be redone by March 2023
2022-10-14 10:07:00
Jacob Rees-Mogg, Secretary of State at BEIS, has dropped plans to appeal against a High Court ruling that found the government’s plan to reach “net zero” was unlawful. This means the government must now draw up a new net-zero strategy by March 2023, to reach its legally binding target for 2050. The net zero plan had always been too vague, with no details of how the target could be achieved.  And it would not provide the necessary cuts by the 2030s. There were various suggestions (eg more nuclear power or more electric cars), but nothing set out the various emissions savings each measure might achieve, or measures to check progress.  So in June a legal challenge were brought by ClientEarth, Friends of the Earth and the Good Law Project. The government’s lawyers were unable to provide detail on how targets would be met. Then in July, Mr Justice Holgate ruled that the strategy was unlawful because it failed to meet two obligations in the Climate Change Act 2008 – monitoring of progress, and details of carbon savings. Aviation should be included in the strategy. A report by the Tory MP Chris Skidmore, due by the end of the year, is likely to influence a new strategy. .Tweet Government drops appeal over net-zero High Court ruling By Adam Vaughan, Environment Editor (The Times) October 13 2022 Jacob Rees-Mogg has dropped plans to appeal against a High Court ruling that found the government’s plan to reach net zero was unlawful. The business secretary’s decision means the government must now draw up a new net-zero strategy by March. Campaigners said that the climbdown was embarrassing but welcome, and urged ministers to flesh out how legally binding carbon targets would be met with more ambitious action. The existing strategy was hailed by Boris Johnson as the “greatest opportunity for jobs and prosperity” since the industrial revolution. However, the plan did not set out the emissions savings for individual measures, such as backing a new nuclear power station or stimulating the uptake of electric cars. That led to a legal challenge brought by the civil society groups Friends of the Earth, the Good Law Project and ClientEarth against the government in June. The case revealed that the government would fall short on its m

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