Government puts up, then almost instantly withdraws, document showing need…

government-puts-up,-then-almost-instantly-withdraws,-document-showing-need…

Government puts up, then almost instantly withdraws, document showing need…

Government puts up, then almost instantly withdraws, document showing need for behaviour change to cut carbon emissions
2021-10-21 22:36:00
Published with the government’s decarbonisation, net zero, strategy on 20th October, was a document called “Net Zero: principles for successful behaviour change initiatives”. It was produced for BEIS, by the Behavioural Insights Team (aka the Nudge unit).  It contained many suggestions for ways the public’s behaviour could be “nudged” to help lower carbon emissions. But the document was only on the BEIS website for an hour or two, before being withdrawn. Luckily one sharp-eyed and quick-witted aviation campaigner spotted it and saved a copy.  The document suggests ways in which behaviour could be changed – while the government, and Boris himself, claims behaviour change will not be needed, and we will all be able to fly, guilt free, in future.  BEIS says it does not wish to suggest behaviour change. The behaviour change paper said, of business aviation, that there needs to be a change in social norms, to international in-person meetings no longer seen as a sign of importance or pride, but “being  an immoral indulgence or embarrassment.” It also says government should lead by example, in not backing airport expansion for financially supporting the airline industry with little demands for decarbonisation in return. .Tweet   The Government’s Net Zero Strategy: Build Back Greener This strategy sets out policies and proposals for decarbonising all sectors of the UK economy to meet our net zero target by 2050. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/net-zero-strategy https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1026655/net-zero-strategy.pdf This says (Page 153) on aviation, the UK will: • “Become a leader in zero-emission flight, kick-starting commercialisation of UKsustainable aviation fuels (SAF), and developing a UK SAF mandate, to enable thedelivery of 10% SAF by 2030, and we will be supporting UK industry with a £180mfunding to support the development of SAF plants.” with no mention of any sort of limit on airport expansion or of demand management for aviation. And Page 343: International Aviation and Shipping: The Net Zero Strategy pathway for international aviation was developed using projections from the TDP and the Jet Zero Consultation. This uses the same Aviation model and assumptions as used for the domestic aviation projections. The DfT’s Aviation model is an established suite of interrelated components used to produce forecasts for aviation demand at the national level, and the associated passenger numbers, aircrafts and CO2 emissions from flights departing from UK airports. Three abatement measures are considered within the modelling; system efficiencies, sustainable aviation fuels (SAF), and zero emission aircraft.   Aviation section from https://drive.google.com/file/d/1-NhoheMrPtvm6Cf42LKPNZvCaeJFphrh/view “Net Zero: principles for successful behaviour change initiatives” Key principles from past government-led behaviour change and public engagement initiatives BEIS Research Paper Number 2021/063 October 2021 By the Behavioural Insights Team This report has been produced by the Behavioural Insights Team, and was commissioned by the Department for Businesses, Energy and Industrial Strategy. Any views expressed within it are not necessarily the views of the UK government, nor does this work reflect UK government policy. Authors In alphabetical order: Kristina Londakova, Toby Park, Jake Reynolds, Saul Wodak.   4.3 Aviation  The aviation sector currently produces 2.5% of global emissions,105 but is a high-impact  activity among those who do fly regularly (with the UK population being far above the global  average), and the sector is estimated to grow 700% by 2050.106 As such, developing  interventions to reduce the environmental impact of aviation is critical, both through a  technological and behavioural lens. In the UK, the CCC allow for a modest growth of the  aviation sector, but below that expected with no intervention. Behavioural assessment  For the most part, individuals’ flying behaviour is likely to be quite inelastic – expecting the  British public to forego holidays abroad would be an enormous political challenge. We believe  a more realistic transition to Net Zero is therefore through a combination of reduced demand in  some select sectors (mainly frequent business flyers, with some potential to also promote  domestic tourism), increased carbon offsetting elsewhere, and leveraging marginal behavioural  changes to incentivise upstream improvements among airline operators and manufacturers  (including long-term deployment of low/zero-emission technologies). Upstream: Align businesses, markets and institutions   Similar to other sectors, de-shrouding the carbon emissions of different airlines and  routes (i.e. through environmental impact ratings on operators, or emissions information  on booking sites) could leverage marginal shifts in behaviour to drive competition  among operators to decarbonise. On the one hand, this mechanism may be somewhat  less effective than some other sectors if consumer choices are relatively inelastic (i.e. I  want to go to Bangkok, Madrid isn’t a viable su

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