Hull’s Canadian cousin – but what makes Hull in Quebec…

hull’s-canadian-cousin-–-but-what-makes-hull-in-quebec…

Hull’s Canadian cousin – but what makes Hull in Quebec…

Hull’s Canadian cousin – but what makes Hull in Quebec different from our city?
2022-03-25 05:00:00
Approximately 3,260 miles to the west of the Humber Bridge, across the Atlantic pond and five hours behind Greenwich Mean Time, lies an impostor – another place called Hull. Hull, Quebec, was founded in 1800 and after initially being named Wright's Town after the settlement's founder, was named after the glorious Yorkshire city on the Humber. It became a city in its own right, before being swallowed up in 2002 as a mere district within the city of Gatineau. But what are the similarities between Hull, Quebec, and our own Hull? And where have their paths differed? Below is a handy guide to what to expect if your sat-nav accidentally directs you to Hull, Canada – like the time one of Diana, Princess of Wales' nieces visited Stamford Bridge, East Yorkshire, instead of Chelsea FC's stadium in London. For the latest traffic and travel news for Kingston upon Hull, England, click here to read more At Kingston upon Hull, the River Hull runs into the Humber Estuary and in a direct parallel Hull, Canada, is situated just three kilometres away from the confluence of the River Gatineau with the River Ottawa. Both places used their proximity to water to their economic advantage. Here in England, the first Hull settlement was a vital port for the export of wool, before over the centuries seeing the rise, and then decline in importance, of fishing, shipping and industry. A sunset over Hull in Canada, as seen from nearby Ottawa. (Image: Wikimedia Commons, Adam2288 / CC BY-SA 3.0) In Hull, Quebec, the riverside location and abundant timber resources aided the lumber trade which was in the 19th century the economic engine along the River Ottawa. A depiction of the log-filled Ottawa River as seen from Hull was even on the back of the Canadian one dollar bill, until its replacement with the dollar coin in 1987. The power of the water has also been used to support paper and pulp factories, but in a similar way to Hull's fishing fleet, the significance of this has declined in recent decades. The Chaudière Falls, also known as the Kana:tso or Akikodjiwan Falls and located just upriver of Hull, have been converted for hydroelectric use – again, inviting comparison to the considerable investment in offshore wind near Hull. Falling on hard times Hull developed as a refuge for drinkers in the 20th century when across the water Ottawa, in Ontario, banned the sale of alcohol in 1916. The ban was reversed in Ontario by 1927 and Hull also banned the sale of alcohol in 1918, but Hull's nighttime and bar economy continued to flourish. Hull was even nicknamed Le Petit Chicago for its bootlegging. Read more: The 13 incredible places that share their name with Hull Many of Hull's bars were conveniently located close to Alexandra Bridge, linking Ottawa with Hull, earning the structure the nickname from a local newspaper, “the bridge of the thousand thirsts”. Along with drinking, it became a gambling and sex work hot spot as well. A Toronto-based newspaper scornfully described it in 1934 as a “mad merry-go-round of sin, scarlet Hull under Capital Hill, a lewd dive of debauchery, a city of unrestrained vice and sin”. There have been no such prohibition acts affecting Kingston upon Hull, but it has also a notable nighttime economy, especially centred around Old Town and the University area of the city. An original view from decades past of Hull, Quebec, from the top of the Canadian Bank Note Co., Ottawa, Ontario. (Image: BiblioArchives / LibraryArchives, Flickr, CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)) The bar life in Hull, Canada, grew seedier and less prosperous after the Second World War, though saw a brief claim to fame again when Playboy named nightclub “Viva Disco” as one of the 10 best in North America in the 1970s. By the

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