I went on the North York Moors Railway and here’s…

i-went-on-the-north-york-moors-railway-and-here’s…

I went on the North York Moors Railway and here’s…

I went on the North York Moors Railway and here’s what I thought
2022-05-15 04:00:00
Spring has already sprung and Summer is well on its way too and with the change of seasons has come the return of the North York Moors Railway. What better time to review one of the most popular visitor attractions in the North East? The North York Moors Railway (NYMR), 24 miles of line stretching from Pickering to Whitby, is about an hour and twenty minute drive away from Hull, a perfect distance for an exciting day out, but back in time for tea. Read more: Giant Trojan War refugee puppet wows Withernsea – in pictures Along with four companions, I went on the off-peak Seaside Special service with tickets provided courtesy of NYMR. We took the midday service from Pickering, arriving at Whitby at 1.45pm. The return trip left the seaside resort at 5.10pm and was scheduled to arrive back in Pickering at 6.40pm. Due to our number, we were assigned our own compartment, able to comfortably fit six people. An off-peak Seaside Special compartment for six adults costs £110, but £121 with an extra 10 per cent donation. A single adult ticket for the Seaside Special costs £41 during off-peak times and £43 in peak, while the compartment prices start at £120 for peak Seaside Special services. North York Moors Railway – the level crossing at Grosmont station. (Image: Ivan Morris Poxton) The Trains Travelling the whole line, you can expect to be blessed with the awesome experience of riding historic steam trains. To Whitby our locomotive was the LMS 5248 Eric Treacy, named after mainline retirement after a railway photographer enthusiast who was also the Bishop of Wakefield. Built in Newcastle in 1937 as part of the largest ever locomotive order placed by a British railway company with a private firm, it was in service for 30 years. On the return leg, a 1960s diesel engine took us to Grosmont before being changed over for another steam locomotive, an LNER Q6, which has run on the NYMR since 1970. I have travelled on heritage lines before, but the sight of the steam train chugging along or being stocked up with water remains captivating. Likewise, I adore the sense of travelling back through time in the heritage carriages. There are few experiences which can match that sensation. Amenities and Information While you may feel like you are travelling back in time, that does not mean you are travelling away from modern comforts. Facilities are available at, or close to, each scheduled station, including tearooms at Pickering and Whitby, and a gift shop at Pickering with an impressive range of options for memorabilia to celebrate a day out on the NYMR. A buffet service with snacks and drinks was also available on both of the train journeys. The buffet service worker was the only paid NYMR member of staff on the trip. (Image: Ivan Morris Poxton) The most surprising feature of travelling on the NYMR was an information guide going through the train, available to answer any and every question visitors had about the line and landscape. I have travelled on a number of other British heritage lines and I cannot remember meeting any volunteers dedicated purely to the educational aspect of travelling on a heritage railway. Paul, the information guide we met, was a font of knowledge. He explained that each station on the line has a different colour theme and is set to a different decade

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