Interactive 3D model shows what lies beneath historic Hull dig

interactive-3d-model-shows-what-lies-beneath-historic-hull-dig

Interactive 3D model shows what lies beneath historic Hull dig

Interactive 3D model shows what lies beneath historic Hull dig
2021-09-20 04:00:00
Archaeologists from the north’s largest post-medieval burial ground dig are using an innovative 21st century tool to reveal the fascinating finds of a Hull city centre site which was once the home of an 18th century jail. During the pandemic, the archaeology and project teams behind National Highways’ £355m major improvement work to the A63 in Hull have been bringing intriguing discoveries of the city’s Trinity Burial Ground to homes around the country and overseas. Click here for more news. As well as providing regular insights via popular on-site webinars and online blogs, Oxford Archaeology – with support from Humber Field Archaeology, National Highways and principal contractors on the scheme, Balfour Beatty – have launched a virtual tour which provides visitors with an interactive 3D model of the current and concluding on-site phase of the archaeology work. It focuses on a former jail – or the New Gaol as it was known then – and what the area to the north-east of the burial ground was used for throughout the years. Drone photo of the foundries, the burial ground’s gaolyard wall, and traces of the gaol An interactive 3D model of the north-east corner of Hull’s Trinity Burial Ground is available. Click here to view. Fran Oliver, National Highways project manager of the A63 Castle Street improvements, said: “Since we’ve been on the ground, the wonderful archaeologists have yielded a wealth of information from the city’s past. “We’ve endeavoured to bring the valuable findings and stories which have been uncovered to as many people as possible. “We’ve had so much interest from local residents fascinated by the city’s history, archaeology students and people getting in touch from abroad, who have helped us piece together how society in Hull lived all those years ago.” Archaeologists are currently excavating structures on site and comparing them to maps showing its changing use. Evidence shows that the New Gaol closed in 1829 when a new, larger jail was built along Kingston Street. It housed men and women awaiting trial, debtors, those incarcerated for minor offences, and those due to be transported for more serious crimes. The plot later became a timber yard in the mid-19th century, then a sawmill, processing the Baltic timbers that entered Hull’s docks. By the early 20th century, the eastern side of the site was occupied by a brass and copper works, its western part by a lead plant. Drone photo of the foundries, the burial ground’s gaolyard wall, and traces of the gaol Stephen Rowland, project manager for Oxford Archaeology North, added: “We’re excavating this particular area in a series of smaller zones, partly to avoid services, and partly to maintain construction access. “As we complete each area, we join together the records and compare them to historic records to create a coherent whole, a bit like doing a jigsaw in two halves. Except in this case there are several jigsaws on top of each other, some of the pieces are mixed up, and others are missing. “The remains of the foundries, which form the uppermost ‘jigsaw’, are generally robust, comprising machine-moulded bricks and concrete. Lying between and beneath them are e

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