Ireland’s subsidies for aviation fuel may be reviewed after COP26…

ireland’s-subsidies-for-aviation-fuel-may-be-reviewed-after-cop26…

Ireland’s subsidies for aviation fuel may be reviewed after COP26…

Ireland’s subsidies for aviation fuel may be reviewed after COP26 deal
2021-11-13 10:01:00
The Irish government may need to review aviation subsidies worth hundreds of millions of euros in response to the outcome of of the COP26 negotiations. This Irish support totalled €2.4 billion in 2019, according to Central Statistics Office data, and was dominated by the excise duty exemption for jet kerosene.  Separately, airports received €23 million in state aid this year to compensate for pandemic-related losses, on top of a similar figure last year. The Irish environment minister, Eamon Ryan, said the European Commission wanted to resurrect plans to impose a minimum tax rate for aviation fuels as part of its 2030 climate plan. This proposal was parked when the pandemic hit. Airlines have fought against the tax. In last year’s general election, the Green Party campaigned to end “harmful subsidies that prioritise flying” and reintroduce the €10 air passenger travel tax abolished during the last recession. The issue of whether to agree globally on limiting fossil fuel subsidies was a key part of the COP negotiations, with producing countries (and others) deeply opposed. .Tweet   Ireland’s aviation subsidies may be reviewed after Cop26 deal, climate minister warns The government may need to review aviation subsidies worth hundreds of millions of euros in response to a global climate deal being finalised in Glasgow, the climate minister has said. By Valerie Flynn (The Times) November 13 2021 The [Irish] government may need to review aviation subsidies worth hundreds of millions of euros in response to a global climate deal being finalised in Glasgow, the climate minister has said. The draft deal, which calls on governments to “accelerate the phase-out of . . . inefficient fossil fuel subsidies”, could require Ireland to look at its own support for fossil fuels in transport, Eamon Ryan told reporters l

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