Jet Zero consultation – what it says on “Influencing Consumers”…

jet-zero-consultation-–-what-it-says-on-“influencing-consumers”…

Jet Zero consultation – what it says on “Influencing Consumers”…

Jet Zero consultation – what it says on “Influencing Consumers” – keep flying, depend on techno-optimism
2021-07-16 06:13:00
The DfT has launched its consultation, called “Jet Zero” on how the UK might decarbonise flights, by 2050. One really effective way to do that would be to reduce the demand for air travel, which is what the Climate Change Committee  (CCC) recommended. The CCC said (24th June) “Lack of ambition for aviation demand management would result in higher emissions of 6.4 MtCO2e/year in 2030 relative to the CCC pathway for aviation emissions.” But the Jet Zero consultation just says “We want to preserve the ability for people to fly whilst supporting consumers to make sustainable travel choices.” And “This Government is committed to tackling the CO2 emissions from flights, whilst preserving the ability for people to fly.” And “we currently believe the sector can achieve Jet Zero without the Government needing to intervene directly to limit aviation growth” and cut aviation CO2 by as much as the CCC says is needed, but by other means – SAF, hydrogen, electric planes etc. It then says it will “seek to address residual carbon emissions through robust, verifiable offsets and additional greenhouse gas removals.” And it acknowledges that these are all “currently at a relatively early stage of development and [their deployment] requires collaboration and commitment across all parts of the sector if it is to succeed.” It also considers carbon information for flights, but only so people can still fly, but choose different airline options. .Tweet     “Achieving net zero aviation by 2050” From:   Department for Transport Published 14 July 2021 https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/achieving-net-zero-aviation-by-2050 Jet Zero Consultation A consultation on our strategy for net zero aviation.  Ends 8th September. Jet zero consultation: a consultation on our strategy for net zero aviation PDF, 2.83MB, 52 pages Jet zero consultation: evidence and analysis PDF, 935KB, 25 pages   Some text from the consultation document is copied below, just looking at the sections on “Influencing Consumers” and “Non-CO2 impacts.” https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1002154/jet-zero-consultation-a-consultation-on-our-strategy-for-net-zero-aviation.pdf Influencing consumers P 38 We want to preserve the ability for people to fly whilst supporting consumers to make sustainable travel choices. 3.39 Flying is a social and economic good, and one that we wholeheartedly support as a key part of building a Global Britain; our strategy will focus on decarbonising aviation and delivering sustainable flying for everyone. This Government iscommitted to tackling the CO2 emissions from flights, whilst preserving the ability forpeople to fly. 3.40 COVID-19 has devastated passenger numbers over the short-term, and we do not yet know what the longer-term effects on demand might be. Only as the pandemic continues to come under control and consumer confidence returns, will we begin to understand how it will affect the sector over the longer-term. 3.41 Nonetheless, even if the sector returns to a pre-COVID-19 demand trajectory, as we have assumed in our analysis, we currently believe the sector can achieve Jet Zero without the Government needing to intervene directly to limit aviation growth. The industry’s need to rebuild from a lower base is likely to mean that plans for airport expansion will be slower to come forward.39 Our analysis shows that there are scenarios that can achieve similar or greater CO2 reductions to those in the CCC’s Balanced Pathway40 (which limits growth to 25% by 2050 compared to 2018 levels compared to a baseline of 65% growth) by focussing on newfuels and technology, with the knock-on economic and social benefit, rather thancapping demand. 3.42 We recognise that net zero 2050 must be achieved and we must ensure that any growth in aviation is compatible with our emissions reduction commitments. The approach we intend to set out in our Strategy will prioritise in-sector reductions through technological and operational improvements, then seek to addressresidual carbon emissions through robust, verifiable offsets and additional greenhouse gas removals. It relies on the rapid scaleup and deployment of technologies that are currently at a relatively early stage of development and requires collaboration and commitment across all parts of the sector if it is to succeed. 3.43 We also recognise that as a responsible government, we will need to keep ourStrategy under review. As such we intend to assess progress on the sector’s CO2 emission reduction pathway and our strategy for delivering through our five-year reviews. 3.44 We expect the approach set out in this draft strategy could impact demand for aviation indirectly. Where new fuels and technologies are more expensive than their fossil-fuel equivalents, and where the cost of CO2 emissions are correctly priced into business models, we expect, as with any price rise, a moderation of demand growth. 3.45 We have recently consulted as a government on changes to Air Passenger Duty (APD), including seeking views on a potential increase to the number of distance bands, in order to align the tax more closely with our environmental objectives. Airlines ordinarily pass the cost of APD onto the passenger and therefore those passengers who fly more will pay more tax. [ie. they do not accept the principle of the Frequent Flyer Levy. AW note] 3.46 And there are ways in which we can provide consumers with greater opportunities to make sustainable, informed choices on their travel plans, and in turn incentivise industry to decarbonise. For example, by providing better information on the climate impacts of travelling on different routes, or on different airlines. A study by the International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT) suggests that emissions per passenger can differ by up to 63% on the same transatlantic route.41 3.47 The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) are planning to consult on environmental information provisions later this year and we intend to work with them to explore whether mandating the provision of such information to passengers at the time of booking could enable better progress in this area. We will also work with the CAA to ensure that that any future requirements for environmental information provision does not have any unintended consequences such as distorting competition. CAA environmental information provision case study The CAA, in partnership with BritainThinks,recently launched a research project to explorethe feasibility and utility of sharing carboninformation with consumers, to enable betterdecision-making.The most significant findings were:• Most participants thought

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