New NEF report on the Frequent Flyer Levy: “WHY DEMAND…

new-nef-report-on-the-frequent-flyer-levy:-“why-demand…

New NEF report on the Frequent Flyer Levy: “WHY DEMAND…

New NEF report on the Frequent Flyer Levy: “WHY DEMAND FOR AVIATION MUST BE CAPPED”
2021-07-11 22:40:00
The Climate Change Committee has advised the UK government that aviation CO2 emissions should not rise more than 25% above their level in 2018 by 2050. However, with anticipated levels of demand, it is likely the CO2 will increase far more than that. So demand for air travel needs to be reduced. A new report by the New Economics Foundation (NEF) reiterates the suggestion that a Frequent Flyer Levy (FFL) should be used. This would mean people pay increasing amounts of tax on each successive leisure flight they take during a year. This rising price, depending on how often people fly, is intended to overcome the problem of flying being out of the price range for many people, leaving the rich to continue flying a lot.  It would be more fair if everyone, regardless of wealth/income could have one flight per year relatively cheaply. Currently Air Passenger Duty (APD) is £13 for a short haul flight, or £78 for a long haul flight.  To keep UK aviation demand to the level in 2018, by 2050, people could have one flight with no tax, but £350 in tax by the 5th flight. But to keep demand 66% lower than in 2018 by 2050, there would need to be £80 tax on the first flight, and £800 on the 5th flight. .Tweet     A FREQUENT FLYER LEVY Sharing aviation’s carbon budget in a net-zero world BY ALEX CHAPMAN, LEO MURRAY, GRIFFIN CARPENTER, CHRISTIANE HEISSE, LYDIA PRIEG (By New Economics Foundation – NEF) 10 JULY 2021 Download the report WHY DEMAND FOR AVIATION MUST BE CAPPED Responding to the Paris Climate Agreement to limit warming to 1.5oC, the UK government passed into law in 2019 a commitment to deliver net zero greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 2050. The Climate Change Committee (CCC), which advises the government on climate policy, calculates that to meet this deadline aviation growth must be slowed so that emissions do not exceed 25% above current levels. Aviation demand is forecast to grow well above this level and, while the international response to the Covid-19 pandemic has temporarily reduced departure levels, experience from previous shocks to the sector suggests demand will soon bounce back​.In the UK, 15% of people take 70% of all flights, while nearly 50% of the population do not fly at all in a given year. This is a hugely unequal division of the ca

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