New review of cerebral consequences of environmental noise exposure –…

new-review-of-cerebral-consequences-of-environmental-noise-exposure-–…

New review of cerebral consequences of environmental noise exposure –…

New review of cerebral consequences of environmental noise exposure – including plane noise
2022-05-30 10:51:00
A group of scientists, mainly in Germany, have done further studies on the impact of noise on health. This includes aircraft noise, as well as noise from roads, railways, wind turbines and general background noise. They say there has been more research on cardiovascular impacts, but little on brain and “associated neuropsychiatric outcomes.”  These impacts include depression, anxiety, cognitive decline and risk of strokes. As with the impacts on the cardiovascular system, the mechanism of damage may be the involvement of reactive oxygen species/oxidative stress and inflammatory pathways. The authors looked at a number of studies, some on mice. The results are unclear, but indicative of the negative impact of noise – perhaps especially the intermittent but loud noise from aircraft – is potentially damaging. The impact may be worse when aircraft noise exposure is in addition to other noise sources. Anecdotally, the mental health impacts of depression and anxiety, for vulnerable people, from inescapable plane noise, at home, are well known. .Tweet   Cerebral consequences of environmental noise exposure by numerous authors. May 2022 In  Environment International Volume 165, July 2022 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412022002331 Abstract The importance of noise exposure as a major environmental determinant of public health is being increasingly recognized. While in recent years a large body evidence has emerged linking environmental noise exposure mainly to cardiovascular disease, much less is known concerning the adverse health effects of noise on the brain and associated neuropsychiatric outcomes. Despite being a relatively new area of investigation, indeed, mounting research and conclusive evidence demonstrate that exposure to noise, primarily from traffic sources, may affect the central nervous system and brain, thereby contributing to an increased risk of neuropsychiatric disorders such as stroke, dementia and cognitive decline, neurodevelopmental disorders, depression, and anxiety disorder. On a mechanistic level, a significant number of studies suggest the involvement of reactive oxygen species/oxidative stress and inflammatory pathways, among others, to fundamentally drive the adverse brain health effects of noise exposure. This in-depth review on the cerebral consequences of environmental noise exposure aims to contribute to the associated research needs by evaluating current findings from human and animal studies. From a public health perspective, these findings may also help to reinforce efforts promoting adequate mitigation strategies and preventive measures to lower the societal consequences of unhealthy environments. Conclusions and future considerations Recently the hypothesis was put forward that genetic (familial) predisposition for non-communicable diseases may be outcompeted by environmental risk factors and leading environmental health experts are calling for an environment-wide association study (EWAS) (Sainani, 2016). This change of dogma is also reflected by statements such as “Genetics loads the gun but the environment pulls the trigger” (Bray et al., 2004, Olden and Wilson, 2000), also put forward by F. Collins, the director of the NIH. This shift was triggered by the exposome concept based on the study of life-long environmental exposure and its association with biochemical changes in the organism and adverse health effects (Wild, 2005, Vrijheid, 2014). Whereas it is well accepted that environmental chemical pollution contributes dramatically to the global burden of disease and mortality (up to 9 to 12.6 million annual deaths, reflecting 16–20% of total mortality worldwide), as reported by the Lancet Commission on Pollution and Health (Landrigan et al., 2018), the (WHO, 2016), and the Global Burden of Disease Study (Cohen et al., 2017, Collaborators GBDRF, 2017), the impact of mental stress and physical environmental factors causing mental stress, especially traffic noise, are far less well studied. Most societal prevention action plans and global estimations of environmental adverse

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