Operation Escalin: Leaconfield’s little-known role amid Britain’s fuel crisis

operation-escalin:-leaconfield’s-little-known-role-amid-britain’s-fuel-crisis

Operation Escalin: Leaconfield’s little-known role amid Britain’s fuel crisis

Operation Escalin: Leaconfield’s little-known role amid Britain’s fuel crisis
2021-09-29 04:00:00
An armed forces insider says personnel at Normandy Barracks in Leaconfield are on “immediate” standby under a plan to keep Britain moving. The source, with knowledge of the Driver Training Squadron, which is based at the East Yorkshire military facility, explained how staff there are playing a key role under Operation Escalin. For the latest Armed Forces news in Hull, click here. Since the beginning of the fuel crisis there has been talk of “getting the army involved” to help temporarily solve the shortage of HGV drivers, which has caused supply issues across the country. There has been a lot of discussion about Escalin, which is the name given to a contingency plan between the government and the armed forces to keep fuel flowing in times of difficulty. The Driver Training Squadron at Leconfield trains Armed Forces personnel in civilian vehicles (Image: Hull Daily Mail) The source explained to Hull Live that this operation is not something that has been “activated” by the crisis and is an ongoing training program that has been in place since 2012. This training program is believed to be continuing as normal with no increase in numbers although some personnel in the Operation Escalin driver pool are on 'immediate standby' meaning they are primed to move if called upon. The source told Hull Live: “I've seen a lot of confusion out there about Operation Escalin and that it has been started or something like that. “As far as I am aware there has been no order and no request from the government, it isn't something that can be switched on overnight so we'd know about it. Get the latest breaking news in Hull and East Yorkshire by signing up for updates here. “It isn't something new either, it has been in place since 2012 when there was a threat of a strike from the tanker drivers over their working conditions. “The Department of Energy and Climate Change, as it was then, realised it needed a plan to get fuel to the pumps if ever there was an issue with drivers so since that time we've had Operation Escalin which is a pool of trained armed forces personnel who can operate civilian tankers.” It is understood that the pool of drivers in the Operation Escalin system is near 2,000 armed forces personnel who all attend yearly training at The Defence School of Transport located at Normandy Barracks, Leconfield, near Beverley. The drivers have to renew their qualifications on a yearly basis to be compliant with civilian standards and new personnel are taken on in the same cycle as others retire. The source said from what they understood there were no more drivers being called into operational training at Leconfield but they did claim that some personnel in the driver pool had been put on shorter ready times in response. For the latest headlines in your area enter your postcode below They said: “I've not heard of any more people going through the driver training courses but what I have heard is that more people are being

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