Pilot tragically died in Breighton Airfield crash after losing control…

pilot-tragically-died-in-breighton-airfield-crash-after-losing-control…

Pilot tragically died in Breighton Airfield crash after losing control…

Pilot tragically died in Breighton Airfield crash after losing control due to loose seat
2021-12-14 15:48:00
A pilot died after losing control of his light aircraft due to his seat not being locked into place. The man, 66, crashed Breighton airfield at Bubwith in East Yorkshire, on November 14 this year. The pilot had trouble landing the Escapade aircraft, which set alight on impact and he tragically he suffered fatal injuries. For the latest East Yorkshire news click here. The Air Accident Investigation Branch (AAIB) has published a report into the crash which says the plane was seen climbing steeply before plunging to the ground and bursting into flames. Investigators concluded the seat movement “caused a loss of control with catastrophic consequences”. The report says the pilot left Rufforth in North Yorkshire to attend a Remembrance Day event at Breighton Airfield. The report said: “The aircraft was seen to take off and climb steeply while appearing to sideslip and drift off the runway centreline. The Escapade light aircraft which crashed at Breighton Airfield killing the pilot “It climbed to approximately 180ft at which point the left wing dropped, the aircraft departed from controlled flight and it descended rapidly to the ground. The pilot was fatally injured. “The evidence indicates the seat moved rearwards leading to the pilot losing control of the aircraft. The cause of the seat movement is under investigation.” The report found the pilot had his seat fully forward but a spring-loaded seat pin was “not correctly located in a hole in the adjustment rail”. Investigators also noted a strap intended to prevent the seat moving backwards in the event of pin failure was not adjusted properly. The report concluded that “the inadvertent seat movement appears to have caused a loss of control with catastrophic consequences.” The AAIB urged owners of similar aircraft to ensure seat pins are secured and to correctly set the backup strap before flying. The report says: “Witness

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