Proposed relaxation of limits on night-time flights at Dublin Airport…

proposed-relaxation-of-limits-on-night-time-flights-at-dublin-airport…

Proposed relaxation of limits on night-time flights at Dublin Airport…

Proposed relaxation of limits on night-time flights at Dublin Airport poses ‘significant hazard to human health’
2022-03-16 17:14:00
There have been several studies, in recent years, confirming that aircraft noise at night can have negative health impacts, especially on cardiovascular health. For good health, adults need at least 7 hours of good sleep each night – that requires a period that long without plane noise overhead. Now the Irish Government proposes to allow relaxation of limits on night-time flights at Dublin Airport. This would pose “a significant hazard to human health” for people living in the area. Currently there is a ban on planes using Dublin’s new north runway between 11pm and 7am, but the intention is to reduce this to midnight to 7am. ie. from 8 hours to 6 hours without noise.  The proposal is also to increase the number of flights overall from 65 per night, between 11p. and 7am, and replace this number with a noise quota scheme, based on the theoretical noise level of planes.  All this would increase the level of noise at night, and prevent people living near the airport or under flight paths from getting good quality sleep – with a high probability of negatively impacting their health and well-being. .Tweet     Proposed relaxation of limits on night-time flights at Dublin Airport poses ‘significant hazard to human health’, says Irish Minister March 13 2022 Independent.ie A Government minister says a proposed relaxation of limits on night-time flights at Dublin Airport poses “a significant hazard to human health” for people living in the area. The Minister of State for Community Development and Charities, Joe O’Brien, has raised objections to recommendations by the Aircraft Noise Competent Authority to reduce the current ban on aircraft using the airport’s North Runway by two hours from the existing one of 11pm-7am to midnight-6am. It follows an application by DAA, the operator of Dublin Airport, to amend conditions attached to planning permission for a new runway which imposed restrictions on night-time flying. A draft regulation by the ANCA has also proposed removing the existing condition which restricts the average number of aircraft movements at Dublin Airport per night between 11pm and 7am to 65 flights and replacing it with a noise quota scheme. However, Mr O’Brien said reducing the limit on night-time flights to just six hours would still prevent affected residents from having adequate unbroken sleep given the recommendations by the World Health Organisation that a minimum of eight hours sleep is required to maintain reasonable physical and mental health. The Green Party TD, whose Dublin Fingal constituency includes Dublin Airport, pointed out that WHO guidelines also strongly recommend that night noise levels should not exceed 40 decibels – a level considerably below the noise generated by aircraft taking off. “Research in this area indicates that night-time aircraft noise has a statistically significant impact on excess risk of hypertension, coronary artery disease and acute cardiovascular mortality,” said Mr O’Brien. He claimed aircraft noise at night-time also had negative effects on people’s well-being, particularly among elderly people and children. “In light of the increasing body of scientific evidence demonstrating the deleterious effects of night-time aircraft noise on human health, it is wholly inappropriate to prioritise the potential economic benefits of expanded flight hours ahead of the wellbeing of people,” said Mr O’Brien. In a submission to the ANCA, the Minister said the economic benefits of reduced ill-health, mortality and disability should also be considered when assessing the cost effectiveness of reducing the limits on night-time flights. Mr O’Brien also claimed increased flights were unnecessary and should be “actively avoided” given the Government’s national climate action objectives and the imperative need to lower greenhouse gas emissions. Over 1,300 submissions have been made to the ANCA about its proposed changes to limits on night-time operations at Dublin Airport as part of a public consultation. A large majority of submissions are objections to any easing of existing restrictions from residents living in the vicinity of the airport and on flight paths. However, Aer Lingus claims restrictions on the use of the North Runway will have negative consequences

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