Public to foot £62bn bill for climate damage from airport…

public-to-foot-62bn-bill-for-climate-damage-from-airport…

Public to foot £62bn bill for climate damage from airport…

Public to foot £62bn bill for climate damage from airport expansions – which the aviation sector should pay for
2022-01-28 10:38:00
Analysis by Alex Chapman, working for the New Economics Foundation (NEF) has found that in allowing airports around the country to expand, the government is letting the aviation industry off the hook for £62bn of damage to the climate. The amount of carbon that airports, and mainly aircraft, emit has a negative impact on the global climate – and thus to society.  Governments can put a figure on this cost, for each tonne of emitted carbon. In September 2021 the government increased the carbon value figure from around £70 per tonne to £245 per tonne (central value) for 2021 rising to £378 per tonne by 2050. The new NEF analysis found the aviation industry will only pay for 16% of the emissions clean-up costs of the 8 airport expansions currently moving through UK planning processes (Heathrow, Gatwick, Stansted, Luton, Bristol, Southampton, Leeds Bradford and Manston). The higher, more realistic, price for carbon makes these expansion schemes uneconomic, if the carbon is properly paid for.  The government does not have a comprehensive mechanism for recouping these costs from the aviation industry. .Tweet   Public to foot £62bn bill for climate damage from airport expansions 27.1.2022 New Economics Foundation NEF) – by Alex Chapman Aviation industry will only pay for 16% of the emissions clean-up costs of UK airport expansions In allowing airports around the country to expand, the government is letting the aviation industry off the hook for £62bn of damage to the climate, analysis out today from the New Economics Foundation (NEF) finds. The analysis calculates that the aviation industry will only pay for 16% of the emissions clean-up costs of the eight airport expansions currently moving through UK planning processes. The analysis finds that new government guidance issued in September has more than doubled the climate cost of the eight airport expansions. This is due to the expansion plans being developed based on out-of-date estimates of the cost of the climate crisis. The analysis shows that key expansion decisions have been made based on underestimated costs to the climate and society. In September, the government updated its ‘carbon values’ – the cost of cleaning up each tonne of emissions released into the atmosphere – to reflect its latest net-zero emissions target. As a result, short-term carbon values have more than tripled, meaning that the clean-up costs associated with infrastructure projects are much higher than previously assumed. The government does not have a comprehensive mechanism for recouping these costs from the aviation industry. The analysis finds that the main emissions taxation policy, the UK Emissions Trading Scheme (UK ETS) is full of industry loopholes and does not take into account the government’s updated carbon values, meaning that the aviation industry will only pay for 16% of the clean-up costs of airport expansions. The remaining bulk of the clean-up cost will fall to wider society and the taxpayer. There are eight airport expansion projects which are active in legal planning procedures, ranging from projects in early consultation phases, like Gatwick airport, to projects which have been approved, but are subject to legal challenges, like Southampton airport. Previous NEF analysis showed that the climate impact of proposed regional airport expansions will be up to eight times worse than previously claimed, as airports have not been presenting the full climate cost of their schemes. The new analysis finds that all eight airports have had their climate costs underestimated even further. Heathrow:  Heathrow, the UK’s largest airport, is planning a new runway ca

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