Report for the European Commission shows the CORSIA carbon scheme…

report-for-the-european-commission-shows-the-corsia-carbon-scheme…

Report for the European Commission shows the CORSIA carbon scheme…

Report for the European Commission shows the CORSIA carbon scheme inadequate – EU ETS more effective in cutting CO2
2021-03-18 12:23:00
The aviation industry’s carbon offsetting system (Corsia) risks being ineffective and poorly enforced.  A report commissioned by the European Commission (EC) is highly critical of Corsia, which it says may do almost nothing to reduce international aviation emissions. The EC is expected to propose in June how aviation industry emissions should be mitigated, including whether to include international flights in the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) – currently only those within the European Economic Area are included. The ETS has its faults, but would be hugely more effective in cutting European aviation carbon.  A key problem with Corsia, apart from it being voluntary, is the use of cheap, ineffective carbon credits. Currently the price of Corsia-eligible offsets is under $2.50 per tonne. The ETS price is up to $43. Many of the credits are dubious, with inadequate certification or quality control of offsets. The rationale of just allowing airlines to compensate for their emissions, rather than encourage reductions, is misguided. The report concludes that the most effective way to cut EU aviation carbon would be to use the ETS, not Corsia, and include all international flights. The UK is considering how to do its own ETS, including aviation. .Tweet   Corsia: worst option for the climate Briefing on assessment of ICAO’s offsetting scheme March 2021 – By Transport & Environment https://www.transportenvironment.org/sites/te/files/publications/2021_03_Briefing_Corsia_EU_assessement_2021.pdf . Revealed: Unpublished EU analysis is scathing of airline CO2 deal By Eoin Bannon (Transport & Environment) March 18, 2021 A global agreement designed to tackle airline emissions could actually undermine Europe’s climate efforts, according to an EU study obtained by Transport & Environment (T&E).[1] The Corsia deal, under which airlines can pay to offset growth of carbon pollution, is “unlikely to materially alter” the climate impact of air travel, it finds. T&E said the EU cannot rely on the ineffective UN offsetting scheme and should re-integrate into its carbon market (ETS) the emissions from flights entering and exiting Europe. https://www.transportenvironment.org/press/revealed-unpublished-eu-analysis-scathing-airline-co2-deal The EU’s assessment of the Corsia airline CO2 deal By Eoin Bannon (T&E) 17.3.2021 T&E has obtained the EU Commission’s assessment of the UN’s aviation offsetting scheme (Corsia), which it received in September 2020 but has delayed publishing. The study (which can be downloaded here https://drive.google.com/file/d/1JF0hDcs1LUGXsrHtya3QPKKUkSH4av-g/view  ) finds major flaws in the scheme, calling into further question whether it can be in any way compatible with the EU Green Deal. T&E’s briefing, also available here https://www.transportenvironment.org/sites/te/files/publications/2021_03_Briefing_Corsia_EU_assessement_2021.pdf  provides an analysis of the main findings as well as our recommendations to ensure Corsia does not further damage Europe’s climate ambitions by being integrated into EU law to the detriment of the EU carbon market (ETS). https://www.transportenvironment.org/publications/eus-assessment-corsia-airline-co2-deal . Aviation industry carbon scheme highly flawed, Brussels warned Airline sector’s reliance on its own carbon offsets system comes under fire in unpublished report for EU The European Commission is expected to propose in June how to deal with aviation industry carbon emissions to meet EU global warming targets By Camilla Hodgson, Philip Georgiadis and Leslie Hook in London and Mehreen Khan in Brussels  (Financial Times) 18.3.2021 The aviation industry’s flagship carbon offsetting system (Corsia) risks being ineffective, poorly enforced and “undermining” the EU’s climate policies, according to an unpublished report written for the European Commission. The highly critical analysis, seen by the Financial Times, was commissioned ahead of key decisions this summer on aviation in the EU’s regulated carbon market. The report said the Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation (Corsia) was “unlikely to materially alter the direct climate impact associated with air travel” and may offer little better than a scenario “in which international aviation emissions remain unregulated”.  The commission is expected to propose in June how aviation industry emissions should be mitigated, including whether to include international flights in the EU Emissions Trading Scheme.  [Currently only flights within the EEA  – intra-European – are included, not those outside it]. The ETS limits the volume of greenhouse gases that heavy polluters can emit and requires them to buy tradeable allowances to cover their output. The study is a warning to the EU to take back responsibility for addressing pollution on European fl

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