Rising use of private jets (most in UK using Luton…

rising-use-of-private-jets-(most-in-uk-using-luton…

Rising use of private jets (most in UK using Luton…

Rising use of private jets (most in UK using Luton and Farnborough) sends CO2 emissions soaring
2021-05-27 12:23:00
An analysis by campaign group, Transport & Environment, has found that CO2 from private jets in Europe increased by about a third between 2005 and 2019.  Flights that entered or left the UK accounted for nearly a fifth of these emissions, giving the UK the largest share of any European country.  Private jet use continued in 2020.  By August 2020, when the number of commercial flights was about 60% down in the UK, the level of private jet use was almost as high as in 2019.  Of the top ten highest carbon private flight routes that take off or land in Europe (the 27 EU members plus Britain, Switzerland, Norway and Iceland) six involved either Luton or Farnborough airports.  The Luton to Teterboro New York route had the  highest private jet emissions, with 565 flights a year, despite a commercial alternative routes between Heathrow and John F Kennedy airport. The private jet sector has grown rapidly, and provides convenience for the very rich, and the ability to reduce personal Covid infection risk at airports, and in crowded planes.  The CO2 emissions from a private jet, with very few passengers, is hugely more per person (5 to 14 times) than on a commercial flight – even first class. The inequity of private jet use, and the huge climate impact, mean the sector should be under the spotlight, especially for the UK in the year it hosts the COP26 talks, in November in Glasgow. .Tweet   Rising use of private jets sends CO2 emissions soaring Environmental impact triggers call for ban on fossil-fuel private jets in Europe by 2030 CO2 emissions from private jets in Europe increased by nearly a third (31%) between 2005 and 2019, rising faster than commercial aviation emissions, finds a new report from campaign group Transport & Environment (T&E). By Eoin Bannon  (T&E) May 27, 2021 The report,  Private jets: can the super-rich supercharge zero emission aviation?,reveals the climate impact of private jets across Europe. It finds that private jets are 10 times more carbon intensive than airliners on average, and 50 times more polluting than trains.[1] According to the findings, a four-hour private flight emits as much as the average person does in a year. T&E points out however, that private jet owners, who have an average wealth of €1.3 billion,[2] can be part of the solution – by paying for the development of greener technology that can help accelerate innovation and clean flying for everyone. The study highlights the continued use of private jets last year despite the pandemic. By August 2020, while most Europeans were still grounded and commercial flights were down 60% year-on-year, private jet traffic had returned to pre-COVID levels. One operator reported an 11.3% increase in private flight sales in July 2020 alone.[3] Andrew Murphy, Aviation Director at T&E, said: “Flying on a private jet is probably the worst thing you can do for the environment. And yet, super-rich super polluters are flying around like there’s no climate crisis. The upside is that the private jet market is ideally suited to help bring about aviation’s Tesla moment, making hydrogen and electric planes a reality.” The report also reveals: Seven of the 10 most polluting routes taken by private aircraft within Europe lie on the UK-France-Switzerland-Italy axis. Private jets departing the UK and France are the biggest source of pollution, representing over a third (3

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