SAF competing for fuel feedstocks will have negative impacts on…

saf-competing-for-fuel-feedstocks-will-have-negative-impacts-on…

SAF competing for fuel feedstocks will have negative impacts on…

SAF competing for fuel feedstocks will have negative impacts on many other sectors
2021-07-24 09:59:00
The aviation industry, and its enthusiastic backers like the UK government, are keen to claim the problem of the sector’s vast carbon emissions can be solved, fairly soon, by SAF (“sustainable aviation fuels”). They agree these should not come directly from agricultural crops, competing with human food and animal fodder for land. They will instead come (as well as fuels produced using electricity) from agricultural, forestry and domestic wastes. These would be the feedstocks.  But there are significant problems, so far apparently overlooked by governments etc, about competing uses for those feedstocks. There are already markets for used cooking oil, and it can all be used for animal food, or in other industries. Taking crop wastes off the land not only means lower organic matter returned to the soil, reducing its structure and fertility, but also its removal for other uses – such as for animal bedding. There are competing uses for forestry waste, such as the paper and pulp industry.  Feedstocks could be used to make diesel for road vehicles, or burned to produce electricity. So if aviation wants these feedstocks, there will be competition and higher prices for other sectors. These problems should not be ignored in the mindlessly optimistic rush for the illusion of “jet zero”. .Tweet ICCT WORKING PAPER 2021-13 | ESTIMATING SUSTAINABLE AVIATION FUEL FEEDSTOCK AVAILABILITY Authors: Jane O’Malley, Nikita Pavlenko, Stephanie Searle   (ICCT_ March 2021 INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL ON CLEAN TRANSPORTATION Summary If the European Union aviation industry is to meet its long-term goal of decarbonization without curbing traffic growth or relying on out-of-sector carbon offsets, switching to sustainable aviation fuels (SAFs) is one of the few methods of achieving in-sector greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions. Though previous, transport-wide EU fuel policies have done little to stimulate the development of the SAF industry, the recently proposed ReFuel EU initiative could set a clear policy signal for the introduction and expansion of an advanced-only SAF industry producing ultra-low carbon fuels. However, it is critical that policymakers set realistic SAF deployment goals that match the amount of fuel that could be made from available feedstock. This study evaluates the EU resource base to support SAF production from 2025 to 2035, focusing only on the potential volumes available from sustainably available feedstocks. Without taking into account the political or economic barriers to SAF production, we estimate that there is a sufficient resource base to support approximately 3.4 million tonnes (Mt) of advanced SAF production annually, or 5.5% of projected EU jet fuel demand in 2030. The estimated production potential takes into account feedstock availability, sustainable harvesting limits, existing other uses of those materials, and SAF conversion yields. This assessment does not factor in the economic incentives necessary to drive that level of market demand or to mobilize investment in new biorefineries.- The commer

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