Schiphol flights to be limited to 11% below 2019 levels…

schiphol-flights-to-be-limited-to-11%-below-2019-levels…

Schiphol flights to be limited to 11% below 2019 levels…

Schiphol flights to be limited to 11% below 2019 levels to cut noise
2022-06-27 08:37:00
After pressure from communities in the Netherlands, the Dutch Parliament has said Schiphol must reduce its flights from 500,000 a year to a maximum of 440,000 by 2023 in order to cut the noise experienced by impacted communities. That cut is 11% less than in 2019 (about 510,000).  It is understand from the Dutch aviation campaigners that the mix in the current Dutch Parliament helped. The Netherlands has proportional representation and enough small parties backed the proposals to get it agreed.  The decision follows a move by Schiphol itself, in which the Dutch state is the majority shareholder, to impose a cap on the number passengers it can carry this summer – although that was due to staffing shortages. Part of the reason is awareness fo the carbon emissions.  Airlines, predictably, are not happy.  Greenpeace, which had lobbied for traffic at Schiphol to be reduced, hailed the decision as a “historic breakthrough”.  This might be the first time a major airport has been asked to reduce flight numbers. .Tweet   Schiphol flights to be limited to 11% below 2019 levels to cut noise, emissions AMSTERDAM, June 24 (Reuters) – Flights from Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport will be limited to 440,000 a year, 11% less than in 2019, to cut noise pollution, the Dutch government said on Friday, drawing praise from green groups but dismay from airlines bosses. The decision follows a move by Schiphol itself, in which the Dutch state is the majority shareholder, to impose a cap on the number passengers it can carry this summer – although that was due to staffing shortages. read more The government also pointed to the airport’s impact on “nature and climate” for the cuts, following criticism from environmental campaigners and the left-wing opposition for its greenhouse gas and nitrogen oxide emissions. The move is intended to restore “the balance between a well-o

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