Shell and its plans to produce “sustainable” jet fuels, using…

shell-and-its-plans-to-produce-“sustainable”-jet-fuels,-using…

Shell and its plans to produce “sustainable” jet fuels, using…

Shell and its plans to produce “sustainable” jet fuels, using plant oils and animal fats
2021-12-08 18:47:00
Shell is an enthusiastic proponent of so-called “Sustainable Aviation Fuels” (SAF). They claim that “SAF can be made from renewable sources such as used cooking oil, municipal waste and woody biomass. It is … has the potential to reduce lifecycle emissions by up to 80%, compared with conventional aviation fuel.” But Biofuelwatch and others are seriously concerned about the use of plant oils, including palm oil, that Shell considers acceptable. Used cooking oil could be seen as a genuinely lower carbon fuel, but there are limited amounts of it. There have been frauds involving companies making money by claiming virgin oils are “used.”  Biofuelwatch says Shell has signed a contract to buy 2.5 billion litres of aviation biofuels over a 5 year period from a refinery sourcing soya and animal fats, currently under construction in Paraguay. Cattle ranching – the source of the animal fat – is the main cause of the destruction of the Chaco forest. Shell plans to produce biofuel in Singapore, where there is pressure from Malaysia and Indonesia to use palm oil, directly or indirectly linked to habitat loss and deforestation. With immense world demand for palm oil, for human food, this cannot be justified. .Tweet   SHELL AND SUSTAINABLE AVIATION BIOFUELS 6.12.2021 By Biofuelwatch  (First published by Greenwash.earth  https://www.greenwash.earth/ ) Shell is an enthusiastic proponent of aviation biofuels, called “Sustainable Aviation Fuels” (SAF). On their website, they claim: “SAF can be made from renewable sources such as used cooking oil, municipal waste and woody biomass. It is a safe, proven fuel, which has the potential to reduce lifecycle emissions by up to 80%, compared with conventional aviation fuel.” Nobody has ever been able to turn municipal waste or wood into jet fuel. Used cooking oil may be a viable feedstock technically – but there’s only so many chips people eat, hardly enough for the leftover veg oil to keep fleets of airplanes flying. But Shell does have concrete plans for sourcing quite a lot of biofuels for aircraft in the near future, plans that are deeply troubling to anyone who cares about climate change, social justice and forests: Shell has signed a contract to purchase a total of 2.5 billion litres of aviation biofuels over a five year period from a refinery sourcing soya and animal fats, currently under construction in Paraguay. Soya production in Paraguay has long been linked to land-grabbing, human rights violations, deforestation and pesticide poisoning. Cattle ranching – the source of the animal fat – is the main cause of the destruction of the Chaco forest, a highly biodiverse ecosystem suffering one of the highest deforestation rates in the world. The Chaco is home to Indigenous Peoples, many of whom are being evicted and losing their livelih

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