Speed camera van man tells all on the law and…

speed-camera-van-man-tells-all-on-the-law-and…

Speed camera van man tells all on the law and…

Speed camera van man tells all on the law and enforcement
2021-09-04 14:30:00
There are plenty of things you think you know about speed cameras and the mobile vans you see parked up on the side of the road – but how many of them are true? You probably think you can get away with speeding if you are a little bit over the limit or the cameras will only catch you on one side of the road. But how many are these are actually facts and which are myths? Click here for more traffic and travel news Gareth Thomas, a speed reduction officer for the last seven years, let NorthWalesLive inside his van to answer all the key questions and dispel some myths. Gareth is a Go Safe Casualty Reduction Officer and former police officer, reports Wales Online who has set the record straight on the things we actually 'know' about speed cameras. Is it true that speed vans have to be visible at all times? No. There are no laws about visibility, so there is nothing stopping an officer operating in the dark. But they don't often choose to do this, and maintain that being visible acts as a deterrent in its own right. Gareth, said: “Legally, we don't have to be visible. I could camouflage myself if I wanted to – but it's all about being fair, education and preventing an accident. “Even if I parked my van and went for a walk somewhere, it would deter people speeding right away.” Can officers only catch motorists travelling in one direction? No. Any car that passes a van is recorded on the officer's camera. So if you're exceeding the speed limit whether you're driving in the same or opposite direction to the van, you can expect a speeding ticket. Gareth Thomas, Casualty Reduction Officer and retired police officer tells all on speed cameras (Image: Ian Cooper/North Wales Live) It is true that the 10 per cent rule exists? Yes. You will not get a ticket provided your speed does not exceed the limit by more than 10 per cent. So for example, travelling at 35mph or above in a 30mph zone will be recorded as a speeding offence. However, Go Safe say thresholds vary and can change without notice. Officially, any speeding offence occurs at 1mph above the limit, but most forces will allow a variance. Are officers a revenue collector for the Government? No. Gareth, explained: “We're not here to get figures or to make money. We're just here to catch the people who are speeding. “If I get a day where I don't get any drivers speeding, then I know I've done my job. “If I've been working an eight hour shift, I just hope at least one person that day has escaped injury or a crash has been avoided.” Can I get caught speeding more than once on the same day by the same camera? The current position with this particular operator is that if you are caught twice in 20 minutes, it will be treated as one offence. In theory, a driver with a previously clean licence could be caught several times on the same day – and as a result be at risk of disqualification under the totting-up system. If you are caught speeding several times on the same journey and accept a fixed penalty for each, you could be at risk of a penalty points disqualification (totting-up). Gareth says it can happen more easily than you might think, for example where several speed cameras are placed on the same road or motorway. However, where offences are deemed to have been committed “on the same occasion”, the court has discretion to impose only the one set of points for two or more offences. Whether or not offences will be treated as committed on the same occasion is a matter for the court to decide. They need not have been committed simultaneously, but they must be linked in some way. So if for example the offences were committed within a few minutes of each other, it may be possible to persuade the court to impose only one set of points. Every case will depend on its facts. Is it illegal to obstruct a vans view of the road? Yes. Obstructing a van's field of view during its operational duties is an offence an

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