Stay Grounded network say new aviation climate declaration fails to…

stay-grounded-network-say-new-aviation-climate-declaration-fails-to…

Stay Grounded network say new aviation climate declaration fails to…

Stay Grounded network say new aviation climate declaration fails to reduce sector’s future emissions
2021-11-11 12:32:00
An aviation climate declaration launched at COP26 on 10th November has failed to place any firm limits on future airport expansion, or growth in aviation demand. As part of the new “International Aviation Climate Ambition Coalition” (IACAC), member states that signed up have committed to working together, they say, to reduce aviation CO2 emissions in line with the aim to limit the global average temperature increase to 1.5°C.  But sustainable transport network Stay Grounded said the declaration will not substantially contribute to aligning the aviation sector with the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C limit. The proposed techno-fixes (electric aircraft, hydrogen, biofuels or e-fuels) will not cut emissions, if the sector expands. As well as preventing the construction of more airport infrastructure, and measures to encourage behaviour change, there need to be taxes on jet fuel and bans on short-haul flights. Mira Kapfinger, of Stay Grounded said: “Far-off targets for 2050 are not worth the paper they are written on  … Relying on CORSIA to reduce flight emissions is like waiting for flying pigs. It simply does not work…. the commitments in the declaration are neither new nor ambitious”. .Tweet     COP26 aviation commitment fails to limit further airport expansions 11 NOV, 2021 BY CATHERINE KENNEDY (New Civil Engineer) An aviation climate declaration launched at COP26 yesterday has failed to place any firm limits on future airport expansions. As part of the International Aviation Climate Ambition Coalition (IACAC), member states have committed to working together to reduce aviation CO2 emissions in line with the aim to limit the global average temperature increase to 1.5°C. They have also committed to supporting specific measures to reduce aviation emissions including sustainable aviation fuels, the CORSIA global offsetting scheme and new aircraft technologies. However sustainable transport network Stay Grounded said the declaration will not substantially contribute to aligning the aviation sector with the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C limit. Stay Grounded spokesperson Mira Kapfinger said that instead of the proposed new technologies – such as electric aircraft, hydrogen, biofuels or e-fuels – what is needed is bans on airport expansions and the promotion of alternatives such as rail. Other key requirements are taxes on jet fuel and bans on short-haul flights. “Far-off targets for 2050 are not worth the paper they are written on,” Kapfinger said. “We need strong emission reduction targets by 2030 to bring aviation in line with Paris. And we cannot achieve these without finally taxing aviation and additional regulations such as a halt to aviation infrastructure expansion and demand reduction measures. “Relying on CORSIA to reduce flight emissions is like waiting for flying pigs. It simply does not work. The same goes for the ‘new low- and zero-carbon aircraft technologies’ mentioned in the IACAC declaration. By 2050, we will still be flying overwhelmingly with today’s aircraft – so flights need to be reduced as much as possible.” Discussion has been ongoing regarding limiting airport expansions. Last year the Climate Change Committee said that any increase in airport capacity would need to be matched by restrictions at other airports to ensure no ‘net increase’,  and last month, a government-commissioned report that recommended climate-driven restrictions on airport expansions was removed from the government’s online library the day after it was uploaded. The Aviation Environment Federation (AEF) said yesterday’s IACAC declaration is a “useful initiative”, but emphasised that international action should not be a substitute for domestic target setting and measures. The organisation said that “to avoid retuning to the pre-pandemic trajectory flight numbers will need to be limited”. It has identified four key points that it says the government needs to commit to. These are less flying, ending airport expansion, making airlines accountable for their emissions and getting airlines to invest in “genuine” zero carbon tech and fuels. The AEF added: “The Climate Change Committee has recommended no net airport expansion in the UK, highlighting that enough capacity exists already to meet the maximum level of aviation demand it considers compatible with achieving net zero.” In addition, the AEF said that financial incentive might be needed. “Currently fuel for international flights is untaxed and most carbon emissions from flying bear no financial penalty,” the organisation said. “To overcome some of the hurdles to developing the zero carbon technologies needed for this sector either airlines will need to start putting in some serious money, or governments will need to start charging hefty penalties for emissions. Or both.” Overall, Mira Kapfinger said the commitments in the declaration are “neither new nor ambitious”. She said: “The initiative does not address the elephant in the room: the growth of air traffic, which is closely linked to high

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