The reason why the M62 ends in the middle of…

the-reason-why-the-m62-ends-in-the-middle-of…

The reason why the M62 ends in the middle of…

While the M62 merges effortlessly with the outskirts of Liverpool in the west, it is quite a different story as it approaches Hull in the east. Any motorist living in East Yorkshire will be all too familiar with the juddering white surface that marks the transition from the M62 to the A63 near North Cave. It is all rather sudden and it begs the question why the M62 does not continue all the way to Hull? In recent years, there have been calls for improvements to the A63 after a number of serious and fatal accidents, along with flooding of the carriageway during winter storms. Some local councillors have suggested that the speed limit should be lowered. READ MORE: How Hull looked 100 years ago in 25 incredible pictures The unique homes on an 'island' in the middle of Hull – and how they met a sad and fiery end So, why does the M62 end where it does, rather than linking the two great ports of the North? Was it due to the cost, the logistics or politics? The section of the M62 between Ferrybridge and North Cave was the last to be built and it required the construction of the Ouse Bridge which was no easy task (the length of time it is taking to repair the bridge at present demonstrates the complexity of the structure). There were a number of headaches with steel supply issues and a partial collapse of the framework. But the final section of the motorway was completed in 1976. Construction of the Ouse Bridge during the M62 extension in the 1970s As for why it ended at North Cave, there have been a number of discussions over the years about the issue on chat pages hosted by The Society for All British and Irish Road Enthusiasts (SABRE). Some enthusiasts say there were never any plans to extend the M62 into Hull. On the chat site, Chris 5156 said: “Please don't make the mistake of thinking that in the UK roads are planned as whole city-to-city routes. They aren't and never have been. “When it was decided to extend the M62 from the existing line at Ferrybridge/Pontefract onward continuation logically took the route past congested sections of A63 at Selby and Howden, served the port of Goole which lies to the south, then went north-east to reach the existing trunk route. “The point was to extend the trans-Pennine motorway to bypass the blockages on the way to Hull and to prevent a dog-leg in the journey that would have seen east-west journeys use a section of the A1. The point was not to reach Hull. “As long as the existing A63 was capable of carrying the traffic load coming off the M62 on the day the motorway opened, there was no need to widen it. If, in 30 or 35 years' time, the A63 would be overwhelmed, that was something to be dealt with later. “The M62 is still deserted by today's standards and I suspect the A63 has never reached the critical point where it was worth investing in it further. Apart from how tidy it looks on a map, there's no problem. The M62 solves the problem it was intended to solve. Beyond there the A63 is capable of doing its job.” The end of the line for the M62 as the last section of the motorway are finished in 1976 at the North Cave junction. The road continued, as it does today, as the A63. (Image: Hull Live) In an earlier chat in 2005 on the Sabre website, Haydn1971 explained why the end of the M62 is not as random as people think. He said: “The M62 ends at a point the B1230 heads to Beverley. The significance being that Beverley is the administrative capital of the East Riding of Yorkshire. “The Motorway Archive speaks of many geotechnical problems along this stretch and also of the new continuously reinforced concrete pavement (CRCP) being trialled here. Logic suggests that maybe the M62 should have finished at Howden and the A614, but maybe the opportunity to trial CRCP here was partly a factor of it reaching North Cave.” Calls for extension Back in the late 1960s, there were calls to extend the M62 into Hull with some arguing it was more important than building the Humber Bridge. In the Hull Daily Mail on November 16, 1968, the Hull Chamber of Commerce argued for the extension. This was before the M62 extension to North Cave was completed. The article said: “A better east-west road link for Humberside should take priority over the Humber Bridge, says a report published today. And it stresses that if there is enough tr
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