The rise of e-scooters and the laws on riding them…

the-rise-of-e-scooters-and-the-laws-on-riding-them…

The rise of e-scooters and the laws on riding them…

The rise of e-scooters and the laws on riding them in Hull streets
2021-05-30 12:52:00
You may have noticed over the last year or so a growing number of people choosing a new style of transport to get around Hull. Electronic scooters – or e-scooters – have been around a while but they had rarely been seen in the city. But in the last year or so, they have become an ever more popular mode of transport. In some parts of the world, such as Auckland in New Zealand, they have become ubiquitous and you can hop on and off publicly available scooters by using an app or just paying by card. The Government announced recently nine areas of the country which are trialling something similar in the UK – including Scunthorpe. For the latest Hull Live headlines direct to your inbox, click here. But debates have raged in places like Auckland over the safety of e scooters which have resulted in some serious injuries, both for the users and pedestrians who have been run over. There does not seem to be an obvious safe area for e scooters to use. They look too vulnerable on the roads and a liability on footpaths. The owners of this new mode of transport in Hull may not realise but they are breaking the law by using public rights of way, be it roads, paths or even cycle lanes. Now, Safer Roads Humber has launched a new social media campaign to raise awareness of the laws on privately owned electric scooters. Watch as someone travels on an e-scooter along Princess Avenue in Hull Video Loading Video Unavailable Click to play Tap to play The video will auto-play soon8Cancel Play now Under Government regulations, e-scooters are classed as ‘powered transporters’ – a term used to cover a variety of novel and emerging personal transport devices powered by a motor. While trials of rental e-scooter schemes were made legal by the Government in July 2020, the laws on private e-scooters have remained unchanged. This means anyone who uses a privately owned e-scooter on a public road or other prohibited space is committing a criminal offence. The potential penalties depend on the nature and gravity of the offence, ranging from a fine and penalty points to disqualification from driving. The e-scooter could also be impounded. People using e-scooters dangerously or while under the influence of drink or drugs could also be jailed. Someone riding an e-scooter in Hull However, it is legal to use an e-scooter on private land with the permission of the landowner. The new social media campaign launched by Safer Roads Humber is running across Facebook and Twitter and comprises a series of simple graphics and an animation. Ruth Gore spokesperson for Safer Roads Humber said: “There is no doubt that e-scooters are a mode of transport of the future – but the fact is at this current time, the use of privately owned devices remains illegal on public roads, cycle lanes and pavements. “The information given out when you buy your own e-scooter is very limited, so people could be buying them with the best intentions to use themselves or perhaps for a child to get to school but are actually breaking the law, hence the reason for running this campaign. “We would much rather raise awareness of the situation than have to take enforcement action. “However, if you are caught committing the offence, your e-scooter can be seized and you could get a £300 fixed-penalty notice and six points on your driving licence. These laws are in place for both your safety, and the safety of other road users.” Find the latest traffic updates in your area While there have been no recorded accidents involving the e-scooters in Hull, Ms Gore is on no doubt they could pose a real risk is not used properly. She said: “It's too early to say if e-scooters are causing or involved in collisions but anecdotally we are aware that riders are putting themselves in danger on this new form of transport. “It is important to remember that e-scooter riders are effectively driving a vehicle and as such need to obey all traffic laws and rules. “However, as riders are unaware of this fact many use them without regard to their own and others safety. “It's important that parents are aware of the rules on e-scooters as they could be putting their child in danger without realising it.” Someone riding an e-scooter in Hull Humberside Police confirmed it has seen an increase in the use of e-scooters across East Yorkshire and Lincolnshire. Traffic management officer Andy Brown said: “For years now members of the public have been able to readily access information about commonly used forms of transport such as cars, motorbikes and mopeds. “Of recent years we have seen an increase in the use of e-Scooters within our force area and, unfortunately, the level of accessible and accurate information has not been the same. “This presents challenges for people who are thinking of buying/have bought an e-scooters as they will not be fully aware of the mode of transport they have in fact purchased. “Classified as a motor vehicle, drivers may not realise by purchasing and driving an e-Scooter in a public place they are committing various offences. “Partnering with Safer Roads Humber, the campaign will assist us in communicating the responsibilities and consequences of private e-Scooter use and also the safe and lawful use of the Rental Scheme e-scooters under the Department

SEE FULL ARTICLE


Share this post