Virtual tourism – the expanding new (zero carbon) way to…

virtual-tourism-–-the-expanding-new-(zero-carbon)-way-to…

Virtual tourism – the expanding new (zero carbon) way to…

Virtual tourism – the expanding new (zero carbon) way to see the world
2021-03-25 11:05:00
Pre-pandemic there wasn’t a lot of virtual travel. The technique was often used to market holidays, to show the customer what they would see and do on their trip. But with Covid, there is renewed interest in virtual tourism and virtual travel. Not only can we look at Google maps street-view, and see for ourselves what a place looks like. There are increasing numbers of companies providing, and selling, virtual travel. Due to Covid, people cannot travel physically. Many are frustrated at being so confined and long to see other places. Some have lost jobs and no longer have the money to travel physically.  So being able to see cities, amazing scenery, the seaside, cultural sites and so on is really welcome.  Virtual tourism has been found to be beneficial for people who, for health reasons, cannot travel; it is a very positive experience in care homes.  There are virtual tours, getting ever better and more sophisticated, of museums. There are online painting trips, showing the scenery that can be painted. There are virtual safaris.  If people are prepared to pay a little for the virtual experience, it helps the destination.  And there are almost no carbon emissions from travel, or negative tourism impacts on the destination.  Virtual tourism should have a great future. .Tweet .  Virtual travel is here to stay Pre-pandemic virtual travel was seen as a bit of a gimmick, an ersatz substitute designed to give a mere whiff of the real thing. In trying out virtual travel, however, many of us have seen its potential. An art course in the virtual Galápagos did give me the feeling of being somewhere else, but by focusing intensely on the drawing and painting it helped rekindle my interest in these subjects, more efficiently and cheaply than actually going to those islands. The company involved, Art Safari, is expanding its range of virtual destinations to places like Cambodia and New Zealand. Post-Covid, virtual trips are likely to become more than a quirky add-on, with increasingly sophisticated experiences. There are now interactive shopping trips in Morocco, online African safaris, yoga holidays and much more. Museums around the world have partnered with Google to produce increasingly sophisticated virtual tours of their collections, while national parks like Yosemite are also producing impressive virtual experiences. As well as video and Zoom, there’s also the world of virtual reality through headsets expecting an uplift. You can even experience the virtual reality of being on an aeroplane at the Somerset House games festival, Now Play This, running from March 25-28. https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2021/mar/23/a-year-on-from-the-first-lockdown-what-has-become-of-travel . Rise of the digital holiday as locked down jetsetters turn to virtual reality Hundreds of people are going on ‘virtual tours’ around some of the world’s most popular destinations By Hannah Boland  (Telegraph)  25 February 2021  After five months locked down in his home, Pat Carroll desperately needed to get away. He was missing travelling, and was sick of only being able to go on the same walks around his home again and again. “It just felt like Groundhog Day, you know?” Carroll dreamed of jumping on a plane, jetting off to some exotic destination or soaking up culture in a European city. But, leaving his local area, let alone the country, was out of the question. Or was it? Just one day later, Carroll found himself in the middle of Venice,

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