Who was Jock, of Jock’s Lodge Junction fame?

who-was-jock,-of-jock’s-lodge-junction-fame?

Who was Jock, of Jock’s Lodge Junction fame?

Work is due to start this spring on a huge upgrade to the A164 and the Jock's Lodge junction, which is due to run until 2026. Under the £87m scheme, a new roundabout will be created on the A1079 to connect it with Beverley, while a stretch of the A164 will be widened into a dual carriageway. Two new roads will connect the new roundabout with the A164 further south, near Bentley. But what is Jock's Lodge and who was Jock? The answer to the first part of that question lies tucked away at the southern end of Victoria Road. READ MORE: The reason why the M62 ends in the middle of nowhere and has never reached Hull 25 fascinating photos of places around Hull 60 years ago in 1964 A wooden sign bearing the name of Jock's Lodge stands outside a detached house, surrounded by a cluster of sheds. It replaced a previous “lodge”, which had stood on the site for at least 150 years until the early Eighties, which a previous road improvement scheme forced its demolition. A few year's ago Maurice Wood, the owner of Jock's Lodge, spoke about the history of the site, which he bought in 1963. “It was part of smallholding when I bought it,” he recalled. The original Jock's Lodge (left) next to the current property of the same name “I moved from Sutton to live here. Back then, it was just a small house with very old wooden cross-beams holding it all together.” Three years after buying the lodge, he got married and his wife Betty moved in. She said: “I always called it 'the little house'. It was cold and damp but it was a lovely little family home.” Mr Wood ran his own livestock haulage business from the site and the couple raised their three sons there. Their world changed forever when a major upgrade of the A164 took place in 1981. That scheme, by the former Humberside County Council, not only created what is now known as the Beverley bypass route between Hull and Bishop Burton, but also paved the way for a new approach road into the southern part of the town. What was previously largely open countryside was carved up by new roads and curving slip roads. The new approach road effectively made Victoria Road redundant, having previously been part of the main route for traffic between Skidby and Beverley. And, thanks to the route of new bypass, it also became a dead-end, with Jock's Lodge left marooned next to the truncated section. “They said the old house had to come down because of all the works so we had this new one built,” said Mr Wood, who decided to keep the name for the new property. It was shame to see it go after all those years, but I suppose that's what they call progress.” The original boundary wall of Jock's Lodge near Beverley (Image: Hull Live) A framed pen and ink drawing of the original Jock's Lodge standing next to its new-build successor hangs on a hallway wall. The only other trace of the old lodge at the site is in a low brick wall that once formed part of the boundary of the property. Mr Wood bought the house from Derek Richardson, a retired farmer, who moved to Leven. Along with his mother and father, he moved to Jock's Lodge in 1950 and lived there for 13 years. When he spoke about the property a few years ago, he described it as a “happy place”. “It got me into farming,” said Mr Richardson. “There were nine acres of land and I kept six cows and some pigs there, I also built the cow shed that's still there now. “The house w
SEE FULL ARTICLE


Share this post